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The NCERA-101 Instrument packages were funded by the NSF in 1972, as a “standardized instrument package” to provide a calibration reference for cooperating laboratories.  The package has evolved over the years and now includes packages with unique instruments.  These packages supplement the calibration standard packages.

 

Four packages are currently available for rental:


With a passion for teaching, Scott Bartholomew is always looking for ways to share knowledge. In 2013, after having taught middle school technology and engineering, Scott enrolled at Utah State University as a PhD student in the School of Teacher Education and Leadership and works with Professor Ed Reeve in the Technology and Engineering Education program. He has taught multiple classes of up-and-coming technology teachers and coached for the USU Design Academy, an after-school robotics team for middle and high school students. Through all this, he has maintained an exemplary GPA and remains involved in research and publishing.

Scott makes every effort to be involved in his field. He has been invited to present at several state and national conferences. This year Scott was named the International Technology and Engineering Education Association’s Outstanding Graduate Student. He serves as the Affiliate Representative for the state of Utah, representing all technology and engineering teachers in the state at the organization’s national conference, and oversees recruiting, retention and professional development and involvement.
photosynthetic
As a doctoral candidate with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth science and emphases in meteorology and climatology, Daniel Barandiaran brings a great skills set to the Department of Plants, Soils and Climate. In the two years that he has been a student at USU, he has investigated hydroclimate in a variety of climate systems, which has resulted in two important peer-reviewed publications.

Through his research on variability of the African monsoon, he discovered a previously unknown linkage between mid-latitude atmospheric circulation and tropical weather, and highlighted current climate models’ inability to reproduce this relationship. The findings were published in the Atmospheric Science Letters, published by the Royal Meteorological Society. The work helps climate model developers improve their models and provides a means for communities to plan for challenges such as drought and flooding.

Daniel has also developed a statistical regression model that highlights changes in a key feature of Great Plains’ spring weather and has studied long-term trends that are potentially the result of human-induced climate change. These findings were published in the prestigious journal, Geophysical Research Letters, published by the American Geophysical Union.
humidity
With a passion for teaching, Scott Bartholomew is always looking for ways to share knowledge. In 2013, after having taught middle school technology and engineering, Scott enrolled at Utah State University as a PhD student in the School of Teacher Education and Leadership and works with Professor Ed Reeve in the Technology and Engineering Education program. He has taught multiple classes of up-and-coming technology teachers and coached for the USU Design Academy, an after-school robotics team for middle and high school students. Through all this, he has maintained an exemplary GPA and remains involved in research and publishing.

Scott makes every effort to be involved in his field. He has been invited to present at several state and national conferences. This year Scott was named the International Technology and Engineering Education Association’s Outstanding Graduate Student. He serves as the Affiliate Representative for the state of Utah, representing all technology and engineering teachers in the state at the organization’s national conference, and oversees recruiting, retention and professional development and involvement.
Spectrometer
As a doctoral candidate with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Earth science and emphases in meteorology and climatology, Daniel Barandiaran brings a great skills set to the Department of Plants, Soils and Climate. In the two years that he has been a student at USU, he has investigated hydroclimate in a variety of climate systems, which has resulted in two important peer-reviewed publications.

Through his research on variability of the African monsoon, he discovered a previously unknown linkage between mid-latitude atmospheric circulation and tropical weather, and highlighted current climate models’ inability to reproduce this relationship. The findings were published in the Atmospheric Science Letters, published by the Royal Meteorological Society. The work helps climate model developers improve their models and provides a means for communities to plan for challenges such as drought and flooding.

Daniel has also developed a statistical regression model that highlights changes in a key feature of Great Plains’ spring weather and has studied long-term trends that are potentially the result of human-induced climate change. These findings were published in the prestigious journal, Geophysical Research Letters, published by the American Geophysical Union.
radiometer
Rental Terms:
  • These instruments are available for rental by any member of NCERA-101. 
  • The rental period is two weeks, excluding shipping time. 
  • Return shipping and appropriate insurance is paid by the user.  Insure all packages for $5000 (US) except for the Humidity/temperature package, which should be insured for $4000.
 
 
Rental Fees:
Any one instrument package $300
Any two instrument packages at the same time $450
Any three packages at the same time $600
All four packages at the same time $750
 
This fee includes shipping, recalibration costs, and account management.  The fee also supports a fund that is used to purchase new instruments for the packages. 
 
To rent any of these instruments, please contact:
Alec Hay
Utah State University – Crop Physiology Laboratory       
435-797-2600
Alec.Hay@usu.edu